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Drawing Resources

Talking, Drawing, Writing: Lessons for Our Youngest Writers

In Talking, Drawing, Writing: Lessons for Our Youngest Writers Martha Horn and Mary Ellen Giacobbe invite readers to join them in classrooms where they listen, watch, and talk with children, then use what they learn to create lessons designed to meet children where they are and lead them into the world of writing. The authors make a case for a broader definition of writing, advocating for formal storytelling sessions, in which children tell about what they know, and for focused sketching sessions so that budding writers learn how to observe more carefully. Based on the authors' work in urban kindergarten and first-grade classes, the essence and structure of many of the lessons lend themselves to adaptation through fifth grade. 

The Drawing Lesson by Mark Crilley

Drawing instructor and graphic novelist Mark Crilley brings his easy-to-follow artistic instruction to aspiring artists in the form of a comic book, providing readers with a one-of-a-kind how-to experience. In The Drawing Lesson, you’ll meet David—a young boy who wants nothing more than to learn how to draw. Luckily for David, he’s just met Becky—his helpful drawing mentor. Page by page, Becky teaches David (and you!) about the essential fundamentals that artists need in order to master drawing, all in a unique visual format. 

Draw With Jazza, Creating Characters: Fun and Easy Guide to Drawing Cartoons and Comics by Josiah Brooks

YouTube star Josiah Brooks breaks down an easy-to-follow method that will help you to invent and draw original characters time and time again. Whether sci-fi or steam-punk, comic book heroines or tattooed action heroes, animal familiars or alien races, you will discover the limitless possibilities of creating your very own characters for comic books, cartoons, video games and more!

The Master Guide to Drawing Anime: How to Draw Original Characters from Simple Templates by Christopher Hart

Nothing brings anime artists more satisfaction than creating original characters to use in a comic strip or graphic novel. Bestselling how-to-draw author Christopher Hart helps them reach this goal by providing insight into the six most popular anime types: schoolgirls, schoolboys, preteens, vengeful bad guys, humorous personalities, and fantasy figures. He supplies templates for each; an extensive array of “menus” of head and body types, outfits, and accessories; and detailed, accessible, step-by-step demonstrations and drawing exercises. 

Introductory Video

Comics for Classrooms is an all-inclusive resource for integrating comic books, graphic novels, and manga into your lesson plans. 

About the Authors

This LibGuide was created by four graduate students at the Pratt Institute's School of Information in New York City.

     

Katherine Hicks

Email: khicks3@pratt.edu

FAVORITE COMIC BOOK: Saga

 

 

Janna Singer-Baefsky

Email: jsingerb@pratt.edu

FAVORITE COMIC BOOK: The Chilling Adventures of Sabrina

Miriam Clayton

Email: mclay202@pratt.edu

FAVORITE COMIC BOOK: The Sandman

Heyrling Oropeza

Email: horopeza@pratt.edu

FAVORITE COMIC BOOK: Nimona

Getting Started With Comics

The Graphic Novel Classroom: Maureen Bakis

Every teacher knows that keeping adolescents interested in learning can be challenging—The Graphic Novel Classroom overcomes that challenge. In these pages, you will learn how to create your own graphic novel in order to inspire students and make them love reading. Create your own superhero to teach reading, writing, critical thinking, and problem solving!

Comic Books and American Cultural History, An Anthology: Matthew Pustz

Comic Books and American Cultural History is an anthology that examines the ways in which comic books can be used to understand the history of the United States. These original essays illustrate ways in which comic books can be used as resources for scholars and teachers. Part 1 of the book examines comics and graphic novels that demonstrate the techniques of cultural history; the essays in Part 2 use comics and graphic novels as cultural artifacts; the third part of the book studies the concept of historical identity through the 20th century; and the final section focuses on different treatments of contemporary American history. 

Black Comics, Politics of Race and Representation: Ronald L. Jackson & Sheena C. Howard

Bringing together contributors from a wide-range of critical perspectives, Black Comics: Politics of Race and Representation is an analytic history of the diverse contributions of Black artists to the medium of comics. Covering comic books, superhero comics, graphic novels and cartoon strips from the early 20th century to the present, the book explores the ways in which Black comic artists have grappled with such themes as the Black experience, gender identity, politics and social media.

Understanding Comics: Scott McCloud

Understanding Comics is a seminal examination of comics art: its rich history, surprising technical components, and major cultural significance. Explore the secret world between the panels, through the lines, and within the hidden symbols of a powerful but misunderstood art form.

The Comic Book History of Comics: Fred Van Lente & Ryan Dunlavey

The inspiring, infuriating, and utterly insane story of comics, graphic novels, and manga is presented in comic book form! The award-winning Action Philosophers team of Fred Van Lente and Ryan Dunlavey turn their irreverent-but-accurate eye to the stories of Jack Kirby, R. Crumb, Harvey Kurtzman, Alan Moore, Stan Lee, Will Eisner, Fredric Wertham, Roy Lichtenstein, Art Spiegelman, and more!

Comics: A Global History, 1968 to the Present: Dan Mazur & Alexander Danner

This is the history of comics around the world from the late 1960s to the dawn of the 21st century. An unprecedented collection includes around 260 expertly chosen illustrations, many reproduced in full-page format for more sophisticated analysis. The authors are the first to write a broadly comprehensive history of this most accessible, democratic, and occasionally subversive modern popular art form, displaying an intimate familiarity with schools and styles, writers, artists, and companies across countries and generations. In showing us both post-apocalyptic dreamscapes and portraits of the everyday.