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Washington Color School: Related Art Movements

Further Research and Related Movements

Mia Bathke

Databases

Art and Architecture Source

Art and Architecture source is a database of art-related sources, journals, and retrospectives.

Art Index Retrospective

From 1929-1984, Art Index Retrospective contains literature about art, design, and commercial decoration in peer-reviewed publications.

Artstor

A database of digital images that works with museums, artists and photographers to collect high quality images for educational use.

Getty Research Institute

Open content program with access to digital copies of art history books, rare books, and literature relating to art.

Humanities Full Text

full text, abstracts and bibliographic information from notable scholarly sources in the humanities.

Jstor

Provides access to Academic journals, books, and primary sources in the humanities.

Kanopy Video Streaming

streaming service of thoughtful and enriching films for scholars and casual viewers.

Project Muse

journal collections in the humanities and social sciences 

Abstract Art

Abstract Art 1900~

Sonia Delaunay "Electric Prisms" 1914 oil on canvas

tate.org

Abstract art is the general umbrella movement under which all the above movements fall. Marked by bold shapes, a lof of color, and no recognizable figures, abstraction pushed modernism in art toward the later movements of action painting and minimalism

Lyrical Abstraction

Lyrical Abstraction 1945-1960

Thornton Willis "Red Wall" 1969, Acrylic on Canvas, 103x108 inches.

idealart.com

European art movement that began in Paris in the 1940s. The movement was borne of abstract expressionism and minimalism and was seen as a less harsh, more flowing version of the two. 

Color field Painting

Color Field Painting

Mark Rothko "Black on Maroon" 1958 Oil paint, acrylic paint, glue tempera and pigment on canvas 105 x 144 

tate.org

Established in New York City in the 40s, this movement focuses on large strokes of solid color. Color field painters focus more on the form and process over gesture of its predecessors. 

Hard Edge Painting

Hard Edge Painting 1960s

Frank Stella "Hyena Stomp" 1962 Alkyd Paint on Canvas 77x77

tate.org

This movement focuses on the separation and division of color on the canvas. Rather than allowing the color and brushstrokes to blend and overlap, each color and shape is distinctly separated by a hard edge, as the name suggests. 

Terms

Key Search Terms

  • Washington Color School
  • Washington Color Painters
  • Color-field Painting
  • Jefferson Place Gallery
  • Morris Louis
  • Alma Thomas
  • Anne Truitt
  • Kenneth Noland
  • Abstract Expressionism
  • Washington Gallery of Modern Art
  • Abstract/ Abstraction
  • Color Blocking
  • Modern Art
  • Contemporary Art
  • Pop Art
  • Minimalism

Books About the Movements

I chose this book as one to reference about the movement because it is one of the original exhibition catalogs from Morris Louis' show and gives a good overview of what his art is like in addition to the fact that it is available at the Pratt Library.

Despite this book being about a slightly different movement than the Washington Color School, I believe it is a good source because the movements are connected to each other. Students will be able to get sufficient information and good research if they can triangulate from this source.

I chose this book as a source for biographical information on one of the artists as an example of how a book that is biographical can inform what we know about a movement. Alma Thomas, being a key figure in the Washington Color School, will have a biography that greatly helps to triangulate knowledge about the movement as a whole.

Though Abstract Expressionism is only one part of the Washington Color School’s schema, knowing the history of abstraction  and abstract expressionism helps know where the Color School was coming from. This movement came right before the Color School so having knowledge about what the Color School was detracting from is useful for research.

More books can be Searched for on Pratt's catalog website!

References

References​

 

Barcio, P. (2004). Defining the Lyrical Abstraction. Retrieved April 23, 2018, from http://www.ideelart.com/module/csblog/post/323-1-lyrical-abstraction.html

This article gives a brief but thorough overview of lyrical abstraction. I link to this particular website for its ease and readability. It gives a user enough information about this movement to decide if they want to pursue research about this related movement without over-powering the information about The Washington Color School

Louis, M., Carmean, E. A., & National Gallery of Art (U.S.). (1976). Morris Louis: Major themes & variations. Washington: National Gallery of Art.

I chose this book as one to reference about the movement because it is one of the original exhibition catalogs from Morris Louis' show and gives a good overview of what his art is like in addition to the fact that it is available at the Pratt Library.

Tate. (n.d.). Abstract art – Art Term. Retrieved April, 2018, from http://www.tate.org.uk/art/art-terms/a/abstract-art

The Tate website articles about art movements is actually laid out a lot like a thorough lib-guide. It gives information about Abstraction but also links to notable artists as well as similar movements and even links to Abstract art on view at the Tate.

Tate. (n.d.). Hard edge painting – Art Term. Retrieved April, 2018, from http://www.tate.org.uk/art/art-terms/h/hard-edge-painting

This website has some great information and examples of hard edge painting. Tate links all the terms it uses and movements it references so a user could research into the movement more should they choose but the information is clear and simple enough to give a reader a working understanding of hard edge painting.

Tate. (n.d.). Colour field painting – Art Term. Retrieved April, 2018, from http://www.tate.org.uk/art/art-terms/c/colour-field-painting

I chose to use the Tate's website again for color field painting because the other two resources were very reliable. They do a very thorough job at outlining an artistic movement like here with color field painting.

Temkin, A., & Museum of Modern Art (New York, N.Y.). (2010). Abstract expressionism at the Museum of Modern Art: Selections from the collection.

Though Abstract Expressionism is only one part of the Washington Color School’s schema, knowing the history of abstraction  and abstract expressionism helps know where the Color School was coming from. This movement came right before the Color School so having knowledge about what the Color School was detracting from is useful for research.

Thomas, A., & Fort Wayne Museum of Art. (1998). Alma W. Thomas: A retrospective of the paintings. San Francisco: Pomegranate.

I chose this book as a source for biographical information on one of the artists as an example of how a book that is biographical can inform what we know about a movement. Alma Thomas, being a key figure in the Washington Color School, will have a biography that greatly helps to triangulate knowledge about the movement as a whole

Wilkin, K., Belz, C., Denver Art Museum., Smithsonian American Art Museum., Frist Center for the Visual Arts (Nashville, Tenn.), & American Federation of Arts. (2007). Color as field: American painting, 1950-1975. New York: American Federation of Arts.

Despite this book being about a slightly different movement than the Washington Color School, I believe it is a good source because the movements are connected to each other. Students will be able to get sufficient information and good research if they can triangulate from this source.